Curriculum

SSIS Program of Inquiry (POI) can be viewed from here.

Language is developed across all subjects and by all teachers at SSIS in either English or Japanese. It is through language that our thoughts and ideas can be  width=50communicated. It is through the language that we can show our understanding and create new knowledge.  It is through language that we can express our feelings and emotions.  

Therefore, it is the responsibility of all teachers and staff to facilitate communication with all students that we can show our understanding and create new knowledge.  It is through language that we can express our feelings and emotions.  Therefore, it is the responsibility of all teachers and staff to facilitate communication with all students. 

SSIS has a set of curriculum standards for English which are taught within the PYP framework. Our standards are drawn from the  US Common Core State Standards. (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010) These standards are taught in context within and outside of the units of inquiry. For language development, the PYP has identified three strands – oral language, visual language, written language – that are learned across and throughout the curriculum, with each strand being an integral component of language learning. Each strand is considered from both receptive and expressive aspects. (International Baccalaureate , 2009)  

Written Language

SSIS recognizes that there are various manuscript and cursive styles when it comes to handwriting. Manuscript and keyboarding are the two forms of expressive language taught at SSIS. Japanese is taught to students from grade 1. As Japan is the host country, it is vital that all students learn how to express themselves in Japanese.  Japanese languag e instruction follows the same PYP strands as  English, but at a slower pace. Curriculum is based on the Japanese learner’s outcomes developed by the Japan Foundation and further correlated to Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR).  

SSIS  has a set of curriculum standards for Science which are taught within the PYP framework. Our standards are drawn from the Next Generation Science Standards  and the PYP Science Scope and Sequence. They are taught as part of integrated Units of Inquiry (UOI). Science does not appear as a ‘stand alone’ subject on student timetables – rather, it is embedded within units of inquiry throughout the year as well as in the literacy program. For more detai

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ls on your child’s science outcomes, please refer to the written UOI curriculum in this booklet.

 

The PYP framework includes four strands of science for students to learn about every year. Each UOI details which strands of science a student will experience.\

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Taking into consideration the structure of the PYP, SSIS has organized its classes and learning to give students the maximum benefit in their learning.  The PYP is designed for students ages 3-12, or kindergarten through grade six. The SSIS kindergarten accepts students from 2 years 8 months into the pre-kindergarten program and from 3 years of age into the regular kindergarten program.  The primary school program begins at grade one for students 6 years of age and currently enrolls students through grade five, with expansion plans to grade six in the 2020-21 academic year. The PYP curricular outcomes are organized in a learning continuum referred to as Phases. A Phase typically covers learning outcomes for more than one academic year, therefore, students are grouped into multi-age classrooms to take full advantage of the PYP framework.
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At SSIS, students can see themselves as “mathematicians”. They learn that mathematics has the power to describe and analyze the world around them; that problems can be solved in various ways. It is far more than a set of facts, equations or algorithms to be memorized.  width= In the PYP, mathematics is viewed as a tool to support inquiry and provides a global language through which students make sense of the world around them. Mathematics is a process of thinking that helps explain the why and how. SSIS  has a set of curriculum standards for mathematics which are taught within the PYP framework. Our standards are drawn from the Common Core Mathematics Standards. Figure 1 is how children learn math in PYP The PYP’s written, taught and assessed curriculum is highly visible within the eight “Standards for mathematical practice”, drawn from the Common Core State Standards as evidenced in the following table. Students study the five strands of math in the PYP framework – data handling, measurement, shape and space, pattern and function, and number. The eight standards compliment the five strands. (International Baccalaureate Organization, 2009) (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010) 
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SSIS  adapts the PYP Social studies scope and sequence to the local Japanese context.                                                           Social Studies is embedded within units of inquiry each year. Social studies has five strands as detailed below and allows students to explore and develop a set of social studies skills and processes.

Each Unit of Inquiry (UOI) details which knowledge and skill sets will be covered and in which context.

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Curriculum for each grade level

You can view K3 Kindergarten Curriculum
You can view K4-K5 Kindergarten Curriculum
You can view Grade 1-2 curriculum 
You can view Grade 3-4 curriculum 
You can view Find the Grade 5-6 curriculum 

Resources